wallow

wallow, welter, grovel can imply heavy clumsy movement and, when the reference is to man, a debased, pitiable, or ignoble condition.
Wallow basically implies a lurching or rolling to and fro (as of a pig in the mire or a ship in the trough of a wave)
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whenever the animals grew hot and tired, they would lie down and wallowHeiser

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a jeep came wallowing through the mud— Mailer

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In extended use the term may suggest the state of an animal wallowing in mud and then variously imply complete self-abandonment
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wallowing in self-pity

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or absorption
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enjoyed sitting . . . and wallowing in the sensual melodies— Osbert Sitwell

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or helpless involvement
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the economic catastrophe in which they were . . . wallowing—J. P. O'Donnell

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or especially sensual enjoyment and indifference to the defilement or degradation that the condition suggests
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publicly wallowed in his infamies— Merle Miller

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in port Rootes would roar off to the fleshpots, in which he would wallow noisily until an hour before takeoff— Theodore Sturgeon

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Welter is often employed in place of wallow, but it frequently carries a stronger implication of rolling or tossing helplessly or confusedly or at the mercy of the elements or other external forces
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he must not float upon his watery bier unwept, and welter to the parching wind— Milton

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beneath the weltering of the restless tide— Shelley

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the mass of the people were weltering in shocking poverty whilst a handful of owners wallowed in millions— Shaw

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Welter, however, may not always imply movement, as when it suggests the position of one who has been killed and lies soaked in blood
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they lie—the fifty corpses— weltering in their blood— Mitchell

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score technical successes, even if their backers welter in red ink— Gabriel

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Grovel implies a crawling or wriggling with face close to the ground (as in abject fear, awe, self-abasement, or complete humiliation or degradation)
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upon thy belly groveling thou shalt go, and dust shalt eat all the days of thy life— Milton

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one moment he towered in imagination, the next he groveled in fear— G. D. Brown

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Analogous words: crawl, *creep: defile, pollute, *contaminate, taint: *debase, debauch, corrupt, deprave, pervert
Contrasted words: soar, mount, ascend, *rise

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Wallow — Wal low, n. A kind of rolling walk. [1913 Webster] One taught the toss, and one the new French wallow. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. Act of wallowing. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 3. A place to which an animal comes to wallow; also, the depression in the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wallow — Wal low, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Wallowed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wallowing}.] [OE. walwen, AS. wealwian; akin to Goth. walwjan (in comp.) to roll, L. volvere; cf. Skr. val to turn. [root]147. Cf. {Voluble Well}, n.] [1913 Webster] 1. To roll one s self… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wallow — ► VERB 1) roll about or lie in mud or water. 2) (of a boat or aircraft) roll from side to side. 3) (wallow in) indulge without restraint in (something pleasurable). ► NOUN 1) an act of wallowing. 2) an area of mud or shallow water where mammals… …   English terms dictionary

  • wallow — [wä′lō] vi. [ME walwen < OE wealwian, to roll around < PGmc * walw < IE * wolw < base * wel > WALK] 1. to roll about or lie relaxed, as in mud, dust or water 2. to move heavily and clumsily; roll and pitch, as a ship 3. to live or… …   English World dictionary

  • Wallow — Wal low, v. t. To roll; esp., to roll in anything defiling or unclean. Wallow thyself in ashes. Jer. vi. 26. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wallow — [v1] slosh around in bathe in, be immersed, blunder, flounder, get stuck, immerse, lie, loll, lurch, move around in, reel, roll, roll about, roll around in, splash around, sprawl, stagger, stumble, sway, toss, totter, tumble, wade, welter;… …   New thesaurus

  • wallow — index carouse Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • wallow — (v.) O.E. wealwian to roll, from W.Gmc. *walwojan, from PIE *wal , *wel to roll (see VULVA (Cf. vulva)). Figurative sense of to plunge and remain in some state or condition is attested from early 13c. Related: Wallowed; wallowing. The noun is… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Wallow — Hans Wallow (* 25. Dezember 1939 in Göttingen) ist ein deutscher Politiker. 1966 trat er der SPD bei, für die er von 1981 bis 1983 und von 1990 bis 1998 im Bundestag saß. 1998 verzichtete er aufgrund einer schweren Erkrankung auf eine erneute… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • wallow — /wol oh/, v.i. 1. to roll about or lie in water, snow, mud, dust, or the like, as for refreshment: Goats wallowed in the dust. 2. to live self indulgently; luxuriate; revel: to wallow in luxury; to wallow in sentimentality. 3. to flounder about;… …   Universalium

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